LURAY HISTORY

Old Massanutten One Room School House

Old Massanutten One Room School House

Luray is the county seat and the county’s largest town. It’s also nationally known as the home of Luray Caverns, a breathtaking underground cavern now on the National Register of Historic Places. Luray is also known as the gateway to Shenandoah National Park and home to the park’s management offices. Stanley and Shenandoah are the other two incorporated towns within Page County, Virginia. Both have authentic small-town charm and quaint downtown districts with shops and restaurants.

Page County was formed from parts of Shenandoah and Rockingham counties by an act of the Virginia General Assembly in 1831. Luray, the county seat, was founded in 1812. Shenandoah, the southernmost town, was established in 1884 and Stanley, near the center of the county, was established in 1900. Page County, Virginia, located in the Shenandoah Valley, was formed in 1831 and named for Governor John Page.

The beauty and serenity of Page County that residents and visitors cherish will endure forever. The county’s western edge is protected by the George Washington National Forest. To its east is Shenandoah National Park, Virginia’s only National Park. There are no interstate highways anywhere within the county’s borders. Page County’s rivers, farmlands and mountain views are as unspoiled now as they were when the county was founded in 1831.

 

Learn more about Page County Civil War history and markers here.